Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
SharePoint

WomensIssues

Navigate Up

March 8 - International Women's Day

 

 

Working Towards Equityhttp://www.etfo.ca/AboutETFO/Webcasts/VideoLibrary/Working Towards EquityWorking Towards EquityThis video explores the power of ETFO's women's programs. Four ETFO members discuss why women's programs are so important and the incredible impact they have on the women who participate.


Each year on March 8, International Women’s Day (IWD), women around the world take time to celebrate the achievements of women and to reflect on our current status, demanding legal and economic equality and freedom from violence

International Women’s Day has its roots in the international labour, socialist, and peace movements that were active early in the 20th century.  IWD has been celebrated on March 8 since 1917 and is a national holiday in many countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Like Labour Day, International Women’s Day provides a focus for the necessary activism of the day.  In 2008, the Canadian Labour Congress launched a year-long campaign on women's economic equality. In 2000 and 2005, the World March of Women launched its global campaigns on IWD.

IWD T-Shirts

Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario is again producing t-shirts (PDF |Word) in recognition of International Women’s Day. Many locals buy them for members, to distribute at local IWD events, and to use as fund-raisers for community women’s groups.

Related Links

Visit the Celebrating Women's Achievements website by Library and Archives Canada.


"We must open doors and we must see to it they remain open, so that others can pass through."
Rosemary Brown, 1973

Classroom Activities for International Women’s Day

  • Send roses to the schools in your district with a copy of the “Bread and Roses” lyrics. Invite the women to spend a recess or noon hour together and share the information about International Women’s Day. 
  • Share the information with students – particularly female students to give a history of the day. 
  • Ask that an announcement be made in the school – along with a brief history of the reason for it.
  • Write a special diary entry celebrating your own achievements as a woman and what contributions you have made to education. 
  • Consider your own economic security. Do you know the facts about your family economics? 
  • Explore statistical information about women in the workforce with your older students. 
  • Teach a lesson on long term economic planning to your class. 
  • Have students make posters using the symbols “Bread and Roses” to display on International Women’s Day. 
  • Share the information you learn about it with someone you think does not understand the need for an “International Women’s Day”. 

Do you have suggestions for other activities? Let us know by contacting Alice Te at ate@etfo.org.​​